A pyramid with a separate capstone can be considered a pair of them.This attribute that presents an X from the heavens may have something to say about why the X is a sign of the sun god.

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According to Rebecca Ryan, a corporate consultant specializing in so-called “Generation X” employees, America’s workforce born between 19 changes jobs, on average, every eighteen to thirty-six months.

The reason, believes Ryan, is that Generation X’ers are constantly in search of work places where they can “learn new skills, build their Rolodex and enhance their portfolio.” Ryan’s “Hot Jobs-Cool Communities” ratings, combined with those of other “experts”, including author Sandra Gurvis’ “30 Great Cities to Start Out In,” has produced this consensus list of cities best suited to men and women in their twenties and thirties.

Seattle, Washington: “Places Rated Almanac,” “ Hot Jobs-Cool Cities” and “30 Great Cities to Start Out In” all point to Seattle as a destination of choice for young professionals.

While the cost of living has continued to rise along with the city’s popularity, Seattle makes it all worthwhile by offering residents a multitude of cultural activities, several professional sports teams, superb cuisine and a nice after-tax “spendable” income to boot.

According to the Boomer-run media, 20-somethings/Gen Y/millennials are narcissists. Back in 1990, Time was smearing Gen X as shallow, apolitical, unambitious shoe-gazers. They would rather hike in the Himalayas than climb a corporate ladder. When they get laid off, they don't get angry--they adapt. The Generation Gap of the 1960s and 1970s referred to the inability/refusal of "tune in, turn on, drop out" Baby Boomers to relate to their stodgy "we survived the Depression and won World War II so turn down that goddamn rock 'n' roll" parents. The old get older and quieter, the young mature and gain influence and replace them. Just as their parents looked down on them, Boomers looked down on us Xers. Millennial hipsters (who don't dress hip--hipsters are dorks) are militant nostalgists. They open restaurants--really good restaurants--whose menus and harken back to the 19th century. I'm wearing skinny black jeans and a Dead Kennedys T-shirt as I write this.

They have few heroes, no anthems, no style to call their own. They sneer at Range Rovers, Rolexes and red suspenders. Though decried at the time as sad and alienating, the dynamic of that demographic divide was as natural as could be. They've revived the ancient traditions of our grandparents: martinis, old-fashioned cocktails. One problem with writing about generational politics is that it requires sweeping generalizations. And of course, there's absolutely nothing anyone can do about it.

Alphabetically, the top ten are: Atlanta, Georgia: Heated growth and a surging job market may finally be cooling, but this “capital of the new south” still boasts a large, vibrant community with a well educated workforce and plenty of activities to occupy one’s leisure time.

One of Arthur Anderson/Fortune Magazine’s “Best Cities for Business”, a top fifteen selection on Rebecca Ryan’s “Hot Jobs-Cool Communities” list and one of Sandra Gurvis’ “30 Great Cities to Start Out In”.

Chicago, Illinois: The locals claim the four seasons here are “winter, winter, winter and the Fourth of July,” but Chicago offers more than just a cold wind off Lake Michigan.

One of Fortune Magazine’s “Best Cities for Business” and Gurvis’ “30 Great Cities,” Chicago has grown beyond it’s gangster reputation to become a thriving metropolis of three million, internationally recognized for its “transcendent architecture, world class theater and rabid sportsmanship.” Denver, Colorado: Always a mecca for young professionals, drawn by this city’s picturesque surroundings and solid business climate, Denver has consistently placed among the best places to live and work in the nation.

As a top twenty-five selection of “Places Rated Almanac,” Washington, D. and its surrounding environs, continues to attract young professionals from across the nation.