Count Vorontsov built a Grecian collonade which overlooks the harbor and also provides a fine view of the bay.

Built in 1837 and site of the famous baby carriage scene in Eisenstein's "Battleship Potemkin," the Potemkin Steps are the best place in the city to view the bay and busy harbors.

Walk along the yellow-bricked Primorskjj Boulevard and note monuments to Aleksander I, Soviet generals and a British frigate which grounded off shore during the Crimean War.

Probably, you have heard the saying: “you will never know until you try”. Its development as a seacoast resort community has contributed to a population that has almost tripled over the last hundred years.

A mild climate, plenty of beaches, and the Black Sea attract thousands of tourists to Odessa throughout the year, earning it the title of "Southern Palmira." Deribasovskaya Street is the heart of Old Odessa, with shops ranging from the government meat store to the Levis outlet.

An easier way to find the bus is to ask at the information window in the train station.

The trip takes half a day and costs 5 hryvnas for the Russian-language version. The Odessa Privoz is one of the biggest farmers' markets in the world and rivals those in lstanbul and Mexico City.

Summer is long and hot with an average temperature of 25 Celsius. Odessa has regular air connections with Vienna (Austrian Airlines and Air Ukraine International, daily), Tel Aviv (El Al), Istanbul (Turkey Airlines), Athens, Aleppo, Larnaka, Moscow, Kiev, Kishineu, Yerevan, Tiflis as well as with some other cities of Europe and Asia.

Trains connect Odessa with Warsaw, Prague, Bratislava, Vienna, Berlin, Moscow, Saint-Petersburg, major cities of Ukraine and many other cities of the former Soviet Union.

Odessa's beach, which actually is made up of several beaches running some 20 km or more, possesses a sea wall and small-scale eating and drinking establishments.