Wearing pink together is a powerful statement that we are unapologetically feminine and we unapologetically stand for women’s rights.” The shape of the hat, with its “pussy” cat ears, is also a play on the statement Trump made while filming an episode of with its host Billy Bush.

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Celia Mc Carthy and Pamela Mc Kinstry, co-owners of Piedmont Yarn in Oakland, show off the pussy hats they made.

Their store will host a knit-in and will serve as a drop-off place to deliver hats to marchers in Washington D. Photo: Celia Mc Carthy Almost every day for the past few weeks Celia Mc Carthy has sat down to knit a pink hat. where they will adorn the heads of some of the hundreds of thousands of women who are expected to march on Jan. Some women are knitting the hats in the privacy of their own homes. Others are going to yarn stores to knit with strangers with a common vision.

The Pussyhat Project’s genesis came a few days after the election.

Krista Suh, 29, a screenwriter who lives in Los Angeles, had campaigned for Clinton in Ohio. She thought about making a hat, and then, in discussions with Zweiman, realized that having women all wear the same hat could be a powerful statement.

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During one of the three presidential debates, Trump referred to his opponent, Hillary Clinton, as a “nasty woman.” Since then, many women have embraced those words and used them to describe themselves as a way to refute Trump’s sexism.

“It’s wonderful to see younger women embrace the term pussy, the color pink, and the power of the handmade and take all of those pejorative terms that have been used to put us in our place and use them to form some sort of communal power,” said Mc Carthy, who lives in Berkeley and is the co-owner of Piedmont Yarn in Oakland.

“You can use your knitting needles and the skills your grandmother taught you and be equally impactful.” Mc Carthy first heard about the pussy hats on Plaid Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, when a customer mentioned the project. Dozens of knitting stores around the country are also holding knit-ins or acting as central collection spaces for the pink hats.

The idea struck Mc Carthy, who had previously made up small pins that read “Nasty,” as a way to funnel her anger about Trump’s election. Ciara Zanze, who bought the 45-year old Rumpelstiltskin knitting store in Sacramento six months ago, has offered her store as a place for knitters to drop off completed hats.

It is really just a rectangle that “forms” ears once placed on a round head.